Can China Afford to Continue Its One-Child Policy?

 

 

by Wang Feng

 

Analysis from the East-West Center, No. 77, March 2005

 

Twenty-five years after it was launched, China’s “One Child” population control policy is credited with cutting population growth to an all time low and contributing to two decades of spectacular economic development. But the costs associated with the policy are also apparent and are rising: a growing proportion of elderly with inadequate government or family support, a disproportionately high number of male births attributable to sex selective abortion, increased female infant and child mortality rates, and the collapse of a credible government birth reporting system. Today, as China contemplates the future of the policy, many argue that a change that allows couples to have two children will not lead to uncontrollable population growth. Instead, it could help meet the fertility desires of most Chinese  couples; avoid a worsening of the demographic and social consequences already evident; and relieve the Chinese government of the immense financial and political costs of enforcing an unpopular policy. But changes will need to come soon if China is to avert even greater negative consequences of the policy.

 

To view full article, visit:  http://www.eastwestcenter.org/fileadmin/stored/pdfs/api077.pdf




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Much of the research of All Girls Allowed has been supplemented by the excellent work of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China.

 

The Congressional-Executive Commission on China is a bipartisan organization dedicated to providing reliable research about China.  To view the most recent Annual Reports, please visit the following links:

 

2012 Annual Report:  http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CHRG-112shrg76190/pdf/CHRG-112shrg76190....

IMAGE: CHINASMACK.COM

 

GUANGZHOU, CHINA--Chen and his wife were perplexed. Every time they talked to their daughter, she complained that she was in pain and begged them to come home from Guangzhou where they were staying as migrant workers.

 

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